Tag: seattle cosmetic surgery


Saying goodbye to Seattle’s Alaskan Way Viaduct

January 10th, 2019 — 12:49pm

This Friday one of my favorite drives on the planet will cease to exist.  I know it’s silly to be attached to stretch of asphalt and concrete but I’m going to really, really miss the Alaskan Way Viaduct. For those of you who do not live in the Seattle area, the Viaduct is a big ugly, noisy and dirty double decker monster of a highway that is a blight on Seattle’s waterfront.  But when I’m shifting my Minicooper into 5th gear on this monster, I feel like I’m flying through a magical landscape with a bursting young city on one side and a busy and beautiful waterfront on the other.  On a clear day I feel like I could roll down the window and reach out to touch the Olympic Mountains to the west. It has the best damn view in Seattle and this view is available to anyone in a car or bus.

But alas, all good things must end, at least that’s the party line.  This Friday night, barriers will go up, connections will be made to the deep bore tunnel that took many years to drill, and in a month, the big machines will come in to tear the Viaduct down.  Over the next few years, Seattle’s waterfront will explode with new developments and I’m sure it will be awesome but I’m going to miss that big ugly magical asphalt ride.

Tomorrow, after work, I’m going to take one last ride and say goodbye.  I’m sure I won’t be the only one.

Thanks for reading and I’d be honored if you followed me on Instagram @sowdermd and @breastimplantsanity.  Dr. Lisa Lynn Sowder

 

I Love Seattle!, It's All About Me., Stuff I love

Will there be plastic surgery under your Christmas tree?

November 30th, 2018 — 3:11pm

Seattle plastic surgeon encourage the gift of plastic surgery.How to give the gift of plastic surgery.

Looking for the perfect gift this holiday season?  That perfect gift may just be a plastic surgical procedure.  Here are a few tips if you are considering this most thoughtful and personal of presents.

  • Only consider this if your loved one has confided in you that he/she is considering “doing something” or that he/she just wishes that he/she could just “get rid of this ______(fill in the blank)”.  Remember, it’s about him/her, not about you.
  • Make sure the lucky recipient is a good candidate for surgery.  Good candidates for surgery are in good heath (physically and mentally) and are in a socially stable place in their life.   If in doubt, shoot me an email and I can probably make an educated guess.  Do not, I repeat, do not give the gift of liposuction as a substitute for weight loss.  Need convincing that doing so is a bad idea?  Check out my blogs on obesity.
  • Make sure that you can afford the surgery!  You wouldn’t want to have to back out because of sticker shock.  I have a lot of ball park prices posted on my web site.  Or feel free to shoot me an email and I can give you a financial idea of how much this could set you back.
  • Make sure that lucky guy/gal will be able to take enough time off of work and/or household duties to recover.  It’s misery to try to get back to work too soon.  You want your gift to be a positive experience.  I have recovery times listed for most procedures on my web site.  Or shoot me an email.
  • Make sure you have nice package to present.   You can’t wrap up a tummy tuck or eyelid lift, but you can wrap up something they might love to wear or use after all the discomfort and bruising is gone.  Maybe something sassy from Hanky Panky for that mommy makeover patient or a pair of beautiful Firefly earrings for that eyelid lift patient.  Or for that dude of yours, how about a nice pair of Ethica boxer briefs You can include one of my practice brochures and a procedure brochure.  Oh, I can just hear the shrieks of joy now!

And just think, your gift of plastic surgery will last years, even decades.  You and your loved one will be enjoying the benefits much longer than a new car or television or laptop.  Do the math.  It could end up being a great value as well as a great gift!

HAPPY SHOPPING AND THANKS FOR READING!  Dr. Lisa Lynn Sowder

I would be honored if you followed me on Instagram @sowdermd and @breastimplantsanity.

Mommy Makeover, Now That's Cool, Plastic Surgery, Postoperative Care

Happy Thanksgiving

November 21st, 2018 — 10:17am

 

’tis the season of Thanksgiving. 

Here are a few things that this plastic surgeon is thankful for……….

  • Modern Anesthesia.  This makes for painless surgery.  And the surgeon can take her time to do a really, really nice job.  During the Pilgrims’ time, the main qualification for being a surgeon was to be really, really, really fast. Yikes!
  •  The Germ Theory and Antibiotics.  Surgery used to mean infection.  Now surgical infections are rare.  Not rare enough, but rare.
  • The Bovie.  This is the electrical gizmo that seals blood vessels as it cuts.  This is why you don’t need a blood transfusion when I do your Mommy Makeover.
  • Surgical Scrubs.  It’s like working all day in my pajamas.
  • My Dansko Clogs.  It’s like working all day in my slippers.
  • Surgical Loupes.  These are my silly looking magnifying glasses that allow me to see important teeny tiny things like nerves and blood vessels.  They also come in handy for reading the newspaper when I can’t find my reading glasses.
  • My Battery Powered LED Surgical Headlight.  Now I don’t have to be attached to the light source by a fiberoptic tube (which is how my dog must feel on her leash).
  • Power Assisted Liposuction a.k.a. PAL.  This PAL is a true friend.  It makes liposuction so much better for the patient and the surgeon. 
  • My Wonderful Staff and Colleagues.  They keep me on my toes.
  • My Wonderful Patients.  They are why I love coming to work!
  • My Wonderful Husband and Children and Dog and Cat.  They are why I love going home in the evening.
  • My Freakishly Good Health.  I’m 62 and still running, skiing, biking, and just starting with tennis lessons.  I’d like to take full credit for this but really I think I’m just lucky. 

Thanks for reading!  Dr. Lisa Lynn Sowder

Now That's Cool, Plastic Surgery

Breast implant revision vocabulary

November 1st, 2018 — 12:05pm

Over the years, I have done a bajillion implant revision cases.  This comes with the territory of being in practice many years (27 years and counting as of this blog post!) and also with showing and voicing an interest in revisional surgery.  Implant revision is a fact of life.   Breast implants are not life time devices and in general what goes in must eventually come out.  Here a primer on the vocabulary of breast implant revision.  Your surgeon may throw around these terms.  Make sure you understand what he/she is saying and ask for clarification if you need to.  Here goes:

Capsule:  The scar tissue that forms around the implant.  This happens with ALL implants.  It’s a normal response to a “foreign body”.  Yes, breast implants (like all non-biologic implants) are a foreign body. 

Capsular contracture:  The presence of a tight and often thick and sometimes calcified capsule.  This results in a “hard implant”.   This is abnormal scarring.

Implant pocket:  The space where the implant resides.  In cases of submuscular implants, the pocket is between the pectoralis major and the rib cage.  In cases of subglandular implants, the pocket is between the breast gland and the pectoralis major.  Sometimes a change in the implant pocket is advised for implant revision.  

Implant malposition:  Implants that are too high, too low, too medial or too lateral.  This is most often corrected by modifying the implant pocket.

Bottoming out:  A condition that occurs when the implant settles too low and/or is too loose.

Inframammary fold (IMF):  The crease under the breast that is densely attached to the chest wall.   The IMF tends to go back to where it was before implants after implant removal. 

Double bubble: A condition that occurs when the implant falls below the inframammary fold.  This is often accompanied by a crease along the lower breast at the level of the native inframammary fold or the edge of the pectoralis muscle.   

Waterfall deformity: A condition that occurs when the implant stays put but the breast sags as it ages and falls over the implant. 

Synmastia a.k.a. unaboob:  Implants that are too close together.  This looks really weird and is very, very hard to fix. 

The gap:  The space over the sternum that separates the breast.  Sometimes the patients anatomy will result in a wider gap than she desires.  Trying to close the gap can result in really lateral nipples or the dreaded unaboob.  See above.   

Capsulotomy:  Cutting open the layer of scar tissue either to loosen it up or to change the position of the implant.  This can sometimes be done with a local anesthetic.

Capsulectomy:  Cutting out the capsule.  This always requires a general anesthetic.  This can be very difficult.  

Capsulorrhaphy:  Putting stitches into the capsule to either tighten it up and/or to raise the implant.  This usually requires a general anesthetic. 

En bloc capsulectomy:  Removing the implant capsule with the implant without opening the capsule.  This is the preferred method for removing a ruptured silicone gel implant.  This is not always technically possible. 

Acellular dermal matrix (ADM) and surgical mesh:  A sheet of collagen or other substance that controls position of the implant and may prevent recurrent capsular contracture.   Alloderm and Strattice are two of the ADMs I have used.  I have also used Seri surgical mesh.  Think of these as an internal bra, a very, very expensive internal bra.

Perfect symmetry:  Not possible but we try.  

Touch-up:  This term best used when referring to make-up application.  I try to avoid this term when it comes to breast implants.  It implies that it’s easy and it’s never easy. 

Revision:  This term best used when referring to repeat surgery on a breast with an implant.   

So there you have it.  Now you can translate what your surgeon has told you needs to be done.  And again, if you don’t understand make him/her go over it again until you do understand.  Tell them Dr. Sowder told you to do so.  Thanks for reading and I would be honored if you followed me on Instagram @sowdermd and @breastimplantsanity.

Dr. Lisa Lynn Sowder

 

Breast Contouring, Breast Implant Removal, Breast Implants

Another side of breast implant illness : one woman’s misdiagnosis and journey back to health.

October 23rd, 2018 — 8:57am

Recently I received this email from a former breast implant illness patient.  I am sharing it with her permission but she has asked me to protect her identity.  I will call her Celeste because I love that name.  I have made no changes except for correcting a few typos.

Celeste:  I read your blog post on breast implant illness and it literally brought tears to my eyes. Tears of joy!!!!  Back up three or four years ago when my life was in shambles – emotionally abusive husband, stressed out to the max at work, sex hormones had crashed, possible thyroid issue…..but yet my family physician said I was fine according to my lab tests. I wasn’t able to see what my ex husband and stress were doing to my body at the time and so I was bound and determined to find an answer. Then I found it – the BII group on Facebook. I had found my answer so I thought. Went through the surgery and wow none of my symptoms got better! It wasn’t until my divorce was final and I was able to relax and started taking a low dose thyroid medicine and got my estrogen back to a normal level that I started to feel normal again. Long story short, I miss my implants like crazy and want them back. I’m soooooo happy to see a plastic surgeon standing behind her beliefs! I totally think it wasn’t my implants at all and more stress and hormone related. I guess I’m going to be the first trial case to see what happens. lol. Thanks for the blog. I really enjoyed it.

Me:  I am very glad you are feeling better after getting your life in order and getting good medical care. Sorry about your implants, though. Have you shared your experience with the Facebook group? I am just curious.

Celeste:  Hahahah.  To spare myself the verbal attacking that would come with it, I have not. All of my friends have implants – a good mixture of saline and silicone, and none of them have issues. I even have one older friend who has had her saline implants for 20+ years to the point one ruptured and still no issues. I don’t want to fight with 18,000+ desperate women who are looking for an answer to their issues when in reality it is probably what you said, the general human condition and life itself. My mom has a lot of allergies and it is possible that my body reacted to my silicone implants (second set), but it took several years for me to feel bad. So, doubtful in my opinion. I had my saline implants for six years with no issues. The issues of general fatigue were once again a result of stress and being on birth control most likely. When I got my silicone implants I went off birth control and my stress was at an all time high. Perfect storm imo. But we shall see what happens. I’m torn on what to get again. I loved how my silicone looked and felt, but still have a slight fear that maybe just maybe it was my body reacting to the silicone (doubtful)……

I’m sure that group has attacked you. It’s like the blind leading the blind and defintely a herd mentality. I can’t bash them too much because three years ago I was one of them – desperate for an answer……and I’m a research scientist, so no dummy either ….. I was just that desperate to feel better.

Me:  Is there any advice you would give women who like their implants but think they have breast implant illness?

Celeste:  Oh geez this is a hard one. There is so much misinformation out there that if it seems pretty far fetched, it probably is.

I lived with my symptoms for years and even had my best friend, who is also my family physician, tell me that I was super stressed and THAT was my problem. The funny thing I have learned about stress in our society is that it starts out small and slow and that becomes the new normal. Then a little more stress gets added on, then that is the new normal. The cycle continues to repeat itself until something or someone stops it. In my case I got my second set of implants (silicone), stopped birth control causing my hormones to crash because I was basically dependent on it, major stress in my marriage, and I was studying for my board exams. And I was the silly one sitting in my doctor’s office telling her that I wasn’t stressed, but yet I couldn’t sleep, felt tired and heavy all the time, my weight was increasing quickly, etc. I went on like this for six years! I’m a little stubborn, ha! Removing my implants helped momentarily because all I could do was sit around and relax. That should’ve been my huge red flag. But nope, I missed it, lol. It wasn’t until just recently that all the pieces started coming together. My hormones are finally at normal levels, my stress is down, my divorce was final two weeks ago. I am finally relaxing and it feels good! I’m still going to the gym and doing strenuous weight lifting and from time to time when I don’t get enough sleep because I’m enjoying life too much and burning the candle at both ends, guess what????? My symptoms start to come back!

For me I’m skeptical that the millions of women that have implants are walking around like zombies (basically what I felt like). I was barely functioning – getting out of bed was difficult, but I didn’t want to lose my job so every morning was a struggle and a pep talk to do it one more day. And what about all the celebrities that have butt implants, chin implants, cheek implants, pec implants (men) – all silicone. I suppose one could argue that those are different than breast implants in chemical consistency, but why aren’t they feeling awful????  I’m more of a believer of an inflammatory response to implants that are too big for the body and overtime the body starts to reject them. My last set were DD and way too big imo. I’m naturally an A, so that is a big difference. And what about all the women in the bikini industry – models and competitors??? They are fine. I’m not saying breast implants are 100% safe, but causing issues almost a decade later is something that I’m not too sure on. My implants came out looking brand new with a thin capsule and no other issues. It is interesting though, the doc that took mine out says he’s seen some stuff that he just can’t explain and the lab can’t identify what it is……so maybe there is truth to it????

With all that being said, I think my biggest piece of advise is know that the mind is very powerful and when you are desperate for an answer, almost anything can be made to fit the given scenario. I wasn’t able to take a step back and evaluate my life and see that the problems I was having were self inflicted. Stress, abuse, lack of sleep, etc. had nothing to do with my implants. After years of living like this, my body was burned out and literally quitting on me. What it needed was lots of TLC! I’m still happy I got my implants removed. That set was too big, but I wish I would’ve swapped them out for a smaller set like my first set of implants. At this point I do miss my implants enough that I’m willing to risk that I’m completely wrong about all this and get implants again……..

So there you have it.  Another side of the breast implant illness conundrum.

Thanks for reading and I would be honored if you followed me on Instagram @breastimplantsanity and @sowdermd.  Dr. Lisa Lynn Sowder

Breast Contouring, Breast Implant Illness, Breast Implant Removal, Breast Implants

Fat transfer to the breast FAQ: What happens with weight changes?

August 30th, 2018 — 2:16pm

I’ve now been doing fat transfer to the breast for over seven years.  I remain enthusiastic about this procedure in patients with favorable anatomy and realistic expectations.  One FAQ relates to changes in the breast with weight changes.  So here is what I have observed so far in my practice:

Yo-yo is a no-no for fat transfer!

If patients lose weight, the transferred fat shrinks and the patient loses volume in her her breasts.  This also goes for patients who lose fat but maintain their weight.  I have seen this in a couple of patients who did not have a major weight loss but who really leaned out with vigorous exercise.  They both became Crossfitters and both lost a lot of the volume they gained after fat transfer.  One went on to have implants.  The other did not.  I am thinking about adding “do not join Crossfit” to my post-op instructions!

Conversely, if a patient gains weight, the fat that was transferred to the breasts will expand and the breasts will get larger.  I have seen this in a couple of cases.  One case was a middle aged flight attendant who gained about 7 lbs on a cruise (this is why I do not go on cruises!) and became alarmed at how large her breasts became.  I assured her that her breasts would go back to their pre-cruise size when she lost that extra weight and indeed they did.  In another case, a patient gained just a few pounds and rather than going to her saddle bags as it usually did prior to fat transfer, she was delighted to see that it mostly went to her chest!

So whenever we are moving fat around, it’s best to have surgery when you are at a healthy and sustainable weight.  I do not recommend fat transfer in patients who yo-yo.  Significant weight fluctuations make for fluctuating results.

Thanks for reading and did you notice I did not say “ideal” weight?  Sustainable and healthy weight is more important and more obtainable than ideal for most of us who are over 25 years old!

Dr. Lisa Lynn Sowder

I would be honored if you followed me on Instagram @sowdermd and @breastimplantsanity.

 

Breast Contouring, Fat Transfer to the Breast

14-Point Plan for Breast Implant Placement

June 26th, 2018 — 1:53pm

Surgical techniques are constantly evolving and breast implant technique is no exception.  In the past couple of years recommendations to minimize implant and implant pocket contamination have been developed.  This is in response to overwhelming evidence that bacterial contamination is the main cause of capsular contracture and may also be the cause of breast implant associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL).   Both of these conditions have been linked to the presence of biofilm around the breast implants.  Biofilm is the product of certain bacteria, Staph epidermidis in the case of capsular contracture and Ralstonia piketti in the case of BIA-ALCL.  It is our hope that with the adoption of the Surgical 14-Point Plan for Breast Implant Placement the annoying and difficult problem of capsular contracture and very serious and potentially fatal problem of BIA-ALCL will drop in frequency.  If you are planning on breast implant surgery, you should ask your surgeon if he/she uses the 14 point plan.  They should!

Surgical 14-Point Plan for Breast Implant Placement, from Aesthetic Surgery Journal, 2018, Vol38(6) page 625

Thanks for reading and I would be honored if you followed me on Instagram @sowdermd and @breastimplantsanity.  Dr. Lisa Lynn Sowder

Breast Implants, New Technology

Spectators in the OR

June 18th, 2018 — 10:30am

Occasionally I have a request from a patient’s friend or family member to come into the OR to “watch the surgery.”  Many times they tell me that they have seen it on T.V. or on YouTube and just think it will be cool to see it in person.  The answer is always no and here is why.  In the OR, what may look like a relaxed and even fun atmosphere is actually a very carefully planned and executed choreography with several participants front stage and more in the wings.  There is me and the scrub tech at the table and sometimes one of the 6th year plastic surgery residents from the University of Washington.  Then there is the anesthesiologist keeping the patient asleep and safe and then there is the circulating nurse who helps the anesthesiologist and also opens equipment and  supplies as needed.  There really isn’t any extra room for a spectator and that spectator really isn’t going to see much because the surgical field is surrounded on all sides by anesthesia, the Mayo stand with the instruments and people on both sides of the table.  And we keep OR “traffic” to a minimum because of infectious issues.  The more people in and out of the OR the greater chance of contaminating the surgical field.  And a lay person has very little concept of the sterile field and probably has not even heard the term “sterile conscious.”  Don’t take it personally but we surgery types think lay people are just walking talking fomites.

“Jesus Christ! I think you are doing that wrong!”

And then there is “going to ground” factor.  Even the most hardened lay person or even a doctor or nurse may react very differently to the sight of blood when that blood is that of a close friend or a loved one.  If that person goes to ground, then we have another patient to take care of!

I have to tell just one little story about a would be OR spectator from my residency days.  I was rotating at Children’s Hospital in Salt Lake City and doing an infant hernia case with the Chief of Pediatric Surgery, the wonderful Dr. Dale Johnson.  One could not imagine a more competent and kind and ethical surgeon than Dr. Johnson.  He was and even after retirement is a deity in surgery circles.  We scrubbed our hands and arms and went into the OR for gowning and gloving.  He noticed an extra person in the OR with a clipboard. (Surgeon’s have a visceral distrust of people with clipboards).  Dr. Johnson politely asked this lady who she was and why was she here.  She told Dr. Johnson that she was a “patient advocate” there for the patient’s protection.  Dr. Johnson politely asked her from whom she was protecting the patient and if she was going to let him know if he was doing something wrong.  She became flustered and just left the OR and I have never seen or heard of such a “patient advocate” since then.  It was very strange and makes me think if a patient or patient’s parent think they need an advocate in the OR other than their operating surgeon, maybe they should choose another surgeon.

So go ahead and ask to be an observer but just be prepared to hear “no” in the nicest possible way.

Thank you for reading and I would be honored if you followed me on Intragram @sowdermd and @breastimplantsanity.  Dr. Lisa Lynn Sowder

My Plastic Surgery Philosophy, Patient Safety, Plastic Surgery

Got Sunscreen?

June 12th, 2018 — 9:47am

Seattle Plastic Surgeon comments on the results of a long running sunscreen use study from Austrailia. 

90% of this ladies skin aging is due to the sun. I hope her grandson uses sunscreen.

90% of this women’s skin aging is due to the sun. I hope her grandson uses sunscreen.

It’s that time of year when I must nag about tanning.  In rainy Seattle it is so tempting to soak up the sun once summer arrives (that is usually about July 5th).  But please, think before you rip off your clothes, don your thong and grab your beach towel.

A good study published by the Annals of Internal Medicine and reported in the Wall Street Journal  has shown that regular use of sunscreen reduces skin aging by 24%.  It had already been shown many times that sun protection prevents most types of skin cancer but now what seemed to be obvious has also got some scientific cred.   Now my nagging has some scientific backing!

I’m certain we are hardwired to love the feel of photons bombarding our skin but way back when we were being hardwired and learning to walk upright, we would die from an abscessed tooth or a ruptured appendix or (if we were lucky) a quick take down by a leopard long before we developed skin cancer or even a bad case of the wrinkles.

Fortunately, sun protection has finally caught up with our longer life spans.  We have really good sun screens and sun block, protective and comfortable clothing and don’t forget about umbrellas, cabanas and the most lovely shade of all, trees.   And lets hear it for staying indoors when the sun is at it’s strongest.  How about a nice glass of ice tea with some fresh mint leaves and a good book.  May I recommend The Storms of Denali by Nicholas O’Connell, or A Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan, or I Remember Nothing by the late and great Norah Ephron?

And just to remind you, I nag because I care.  Thanks for reading.  Dr. Lisa Lynn Sowder

I would be honored if you followed me on Instagram @sowdermd and @breastimplantsanity.

Aging Issues, General Health, Skin Cancer, Skin Care, sun damage

Did you know that I am “Woman of Year in Medicine and Healthcare” and that “Seattle’s #1 Ranked Plastic Surgeon” is not a plastic surgeon?

May 17th, 2018 — 12:20pm

Seattle Plastic Surgeon ponders the meaning of all of these awards than just seem to arrive in the mail along with a place for credit card information.  

Dr. Sowder, you are really are the best.

Dr. Sowder, you are really are the best.

I was dejunking my office this week and came across a bunch of letters and a few emails informing me how fabulous I am and inviting me to order various plaques and trophies (prices range from $99 – $530) so I can spread the news of my fabulousness.

Over the past few years I have been named one of “America’s Top Surgeons”, one of  “America’s Top Plastic Surgeons” (with honors of distinction and excellence), one of the “Leading Physicians of The World”, one of the “Best Doctors in America”, one of “Washington State’s Best Doctors”, “the 2015 Best Business of Seattle in the category of Cosmetic Surgeons”, “One of the 10 Best Plastic Surgeons for Washington”, “Top 100 Health Professionals – 2018”, and (my favorite), “Woman of the Year in Medicine and Healthcare.”

I have to say that I am honored and humbled by all of these accolades but I have a sneaking suspicion that these “associations” really don’t know anything about me or my practice and just want my money.  I’m pretty cheap so you won’t see any this stuff hanging on my wall.

But …………… I am not at all shy about letting the world know about the fabulous awards I actually have received without having to fork over a dime.  Going way, way, way back – here they are, at least the ones I can remember:

  • Tidiest camper at Camp Sweyolaken as a Campfire Girl.  You would laugh at this if you could see my desk right now.
  • Best Book Week Poster – 5th grade, Hutton School, Spokane, Washington (Mom was so proud).
  • First Place Beginner Dog Obediance (shared with Mickey, the wonderdog), Spokane Canine Club.
  • Best Undergraduate Research Paper, University of Washington, 1978 (I got $400 which back then was a boat load of money.  Actually it still is a boat load of money).
  • Phi Beta Kappa – University of Washington, 1978.
  • Alpha Omega Alpha – University of Washington School of Medicine, 1983.
  • Best Paper, Senior Plastic Surgery Residents’ Conference, 1991.
  • Golden Hands Award for the best cosmetic surgery case, Washington Society of Plastic Surgeons, 2005.
  • “The Dom”. a.k.a. best presentation, Northwest Society of Plastic Surgeons, 2009.  It’s called “The Dom” because the prize is a bottle of Dom Perignon.

Oh, and this just in:  There is a new doctor in town who claims on his home page that he is ranked the #1 Plastic Surgeon in Seattle.  And his home page is cluttered with the aforementioned fake plastic surgeon awards.  Problem is that he has not spent one day in an approved plastic surgery residency, is not certified or eligible to be certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery (the only real plastic surgery board), and is not a member of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, the Washington Society of Plastic Surgeons or the Northwest Society of Plastic Surgeons.  In other words, he is not a plastic surgeon!!!  Is he a good non-plastic surgeon?  Don’t know.  I do know that he is not an honest surgeon.

Thanks for reading and be careful out there when picking a plastic surgeon.  Make sure you pick a real one.  Check your surgeon’s credentials by visiting the American Board of Plastic Surgery 

Thanks for reading, (Multiple Award Winning) Dr. Lisa Lynn Sowder

I would be honored if you followed me on Instagram @sowdermd and @breastimplantsanity.

 

My Plastic Surgery Philosophy, Now That's a Little Weird, This Makes Me Cranky.

Back to top